Post Archives

Archives for January 2016

two things

by J J CohenMedievalists and others who have been following the recent discussions about Allen Frantzen and his anti-feminism, would you please read this?... read more »
From: In the Middle on 1 February 2016

A Calendar Post for February 2016

For more information about the Bedford Hours, please see our post for January 2016; for more on medieval calendars in general, our original calendar post... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 1 February 2016

An onomastic calendar: January

January 1: Albert II was crowned king of Hungary and Croatia in 1438. January 2: Italian painter Piero di Cosimo was born in 1462. January 3: Martin Luther... read more »

Protestant names: Virtue names

The final place where the influence of distinctly Protestant naming practices can be seen are in virtue names. Virtue names were rare before the 16th... read more »

Elemental Ecocriticism: at MLA, and at 30% off for blog readers

by J J Cohen[So much going on blogwide at the moment, but please read and consider signing this letter to the Medieval Academy]Elemental Ecocriticism:... read more »
From: In the Middle on 30 January 2016

Things alchemy was related to and helped with and used by

This is a short blog post covering an interesting but rather deep topic which would require a great deal more research to make a full on really interesting... read more »
From: distillatio on 30 January 2016

Protestant names: New Testament influences on men’s names (part 2)

We’re in the home stretch with the Biblical names! In this our final post on this sub-topic of our monthly topic, we look at the New Testament men’s... read more »

Call for Signatures: Letter of Concern to MAA

by SUZANNE CONKLIN AKBARI, JONATHAN HSY, EILEEN JOY, ALEX MUELLERITM readers and any other medievalists brought to this link through other means:Please... read more »
From: In the Middle on 29 January 2016

Upcoming Event: Professor Paul Fouracre Lecture on 18 February

Satellite imagery of Saint-Wandrille-Rançon, Google EarthTaming the Wild, and Wilding the Tame: Town and Country in Early Frankish HagiographySpeaker:... read more »
From: Manchester Medieval Society on 29 January 2016

Caption Competition Number 4

Sometimes we come across images that are just perfect for creative captions. Here is one from an Apocalypse manuscript soon to be fully digitised, Harley... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 29 January 2016

Bigamy and bureaucracy

Mary Elizabeth Braddon by William Powell Frith, oil on canvas, exhibited 1865  Over the Christmas holiday I was reading some Victorian novels: I re-read... read more »
From: Magistra et Mater on 28 January 2016

Friday January 29: Elizabeth Scala, "Feminism and the F-Word"

Please join us for this lecture and discussion. The event is free and welcomes all who wish to attend.Elizabeth ScalaUniversity of Texas-Austin"Feminism... read more »
From: GW MEMSI on 28 January 2016

Tales of Half-Friends, Bedcovers and Sheep crossing streams: A parental lecture of the 13th century

Harley MS 527, a collection of romantic and didactic texts, mostly in Anglo-Norman French has recently been fully digitised. Of particular interest is... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 28 January 2016

Protestant names: New Testament influences on men’s names (part 1)

The month is nearing the end, but what we have to say about Protestant influences on naming practices in the second half of the 16th C certainly isn’t!... read more »

Our Values + Thanks Donna Zuckerberg/Jezebel

Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, "Enigma-Riddle-Joke" (2015)by KARL STEELFirst of all, read Jeffrey's post below, showcasing the wonderful, heartbreaking work... read more »
From: In the Middle on 27 January 2016

Holy Wells, Lowercase Letters and Femfog: Medieval News Roundup

What we came across in our web browsing over the last week or so that will be of interest to medievalists...[View the story "Holy Wells, Lowercase Letters... read more »
From: Medieval News on 27 January 2016

"Sometimes I have to be reminded what the stakes are, so that I may proceed with fear and trembling"

I took this picture of Dan on Matanuska Glacierby J J CohenI'm proud to have Daniel T. Kline as a friend.If memory serves, we first met at Kzoo many years... read more »
From: In the Middle on 27 January 2016

1066 and the other papal banner

In 1066, the Norman Duke William persuaded Pope Alexander II to send him a papal banner, signifying his approval of William’s cross-Channel enterprise... read more »
From: Turbulent Priests on 26 January 2016

WoM: Anglo-Norman at the inn (Manières de Langage)

– Syre, ou pensez vous chivacher anoet?– Sire, a la prochene ville, si Dieu plest.– Sire, que l’apellez la prochyin ville?–... read more »
From: Anglo-Norman words on 26 January 2016

Fit for a Queen

This post is really just the story of how one thing leads to another in research.  It’s also to tell you about what I’ve been working... read more »
From: Stylisticienne on 25 January 2016

Embodying Medieval Women in Historical Fiction

My fiction is the natural outgrowth of a fascination with medieval history and culture, my itch to explore what it might have been like to live in those... read more »

Protestant names: New Testament influences on women’s names

Having completed the Old Testament, we now move on to the New Testament. When Bardsley discusses the rise of what he identifies as a specifically Puritan... read more »

Practice round

Contient : 1° Traité abrégé de « la forme des tournoys… au temps du roy Uterpandragon » ; 2° « Les... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 23 January 2016

Tournois à Chambely et à Bailleul 1519

Contient : 1° Traité abrégé de « la forme des tournoys… au temps du roy Uterpandragon » ; 2° « Les... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 23 January 2016

Pas d’armes de Saudricourt

Contient : 1° Traité abrégé de « la forme des tournoys… au temps du roy Uterpandragon » ; 2° « Les... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 23 January 2016

Paysage

Anciennes chroniques d’Angleterre, Jean de Wavrin. Français 80 Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 23 January 2016

Man in a red turban

Is that the Belfry of Bruges in the background? Anciennes chroniques d’Angleterre, Jean de Wavrin. Français 80 Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 23 January 2016

Protestant names: Old Testament influences on men’s names (part 3)

In this post we finish up looking at Old Testament names, and whether we can see evidence of correlation between Protestant influence and the use of these... read more »

Ongoing bell posts -Part 2 – making small bells

I posses several late or post-medieval bells or rather rumbler bells, purchased from metal detectorists. One in particular is an interesting find. Here... read more »
From: My medieval foundry on 23 January 2016

The Chronicle Piece on #Femfog

by J J CohenHere is Rio Fernandes reporting on the discovery that Allen Frantzen has published misogynistic web pages. There is more to the story (stay... read more »
From: In the Middle on 22 January 2016

St Wendreda and the Danish Conquest

St Wendreda, March January 22 is the feast of St Wendreda, an obscure East Anglian saint about whom very little is known. Her name suggests she was an... read more »
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 22 January 2016

Protestant names: Old Testament influences on men’s names (part 2)

In this post we continue where we left off, with the next installment of Old Testament names and where they show clear influence of the rise of Protestantism... read more »

Building the Graph of Medieval Data

Researchers in Classics and Ancient History have achieved a great deal in the Linked Data world, through services like Pelagios, Pleiades, Perseus, Arachne... read more »

An Anglo-Saxon Anecdote: Alleluia, the Anglo-Saxon Boo!

Alfred and the cakes, Cnut and the waves, and Eadmer the flying monk: Anglo-Saxon history is full of anecdotes. On this blog I will regularly highlight... read more »
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 21 January 2016

Happy 10th Birthday, In the Middle!

by J J Cohena meditation on what the blog has meant to me, personally: I cannot speak for anyone elseIn the Middle began on January 18, 2006 with a little... read more »
From: In the Middle on 21 January 2016

Hugh of Avalon, and the Limits of Sympathy

by KARL STEELGerald of Wales' life of Hugh of Avalon, bishop of Lincoln, speaks twice of his zeal for burying the dead.Certain dead, anyway: here's a story... read more »
From: In the Middle on 21 January 2016

Protestant names: Old Testament influences on men’s names (part 1)

Having looked at women’s names from the Old Testament in our previous post, in this one we turn to the men! Except, first, the rectification of an... read more »

Christians and Jews in Angevin England now in paperback

by J J CohenLongtime readers of this blog will remember that I blogged the conference "York 1190: Jews and Others in the Wake of Massacre" back in the... read more »
From: In the Middle on 20 January 2016

Seminar CCXXXV: putting Archbishop Chrodegang in his place

Again, rather than alternate I’ll follow a seminar report with a seminar report, partly because at this point in the notional sequence I was lamenting... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 20 January 2016

New Arrivals for the New Year on Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

A new year brings a new update to the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts – a host of new images and new manuscripts are now available online. As many... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 20 January 2016

Seminar CCXXXIV: ground-level archaeology in early medieval northern Spain

Despite my usual policy of alternating them with what I think of as local-content posts, I’m going to crack straight on with another seminar report.... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 19 January 2016

Isidore, Burckhardt and Brown (Guest Blog by David Ganz)

In a fine article on Burckhardt’s Cultural History of the Greeks, Glen Bowersock pointed out how so many of Burckhardt’s insights into Late... read more »
From: merovingianworld on 19 January 2016

Antifeminism, Whiteness, and Medieval Studies

by Dorothy KimMLK Day 2016Recently, much of the medieval interwebs have been having discussions on Facebook and Twitter (#femfog) about the implications... read more »
From: In the Middle on 18 January 2016

Seminar CXXXIII: the limits of Byzantine contact with India

My backlog now crawls back towards a ten-month lag as I reach March 2015! Either I was busy during the early part of that month or not much was happening,... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 18 January 2016

#FemFog Medievalism: Lessons Learned

by JONATHAN HSYTwo ITM postings in one day! This posting began as a set of reflections on a public Facebook status update but I'm reposting it all here... read more »
From: In the Middle on 18 January 2016

"Not back then they weren't": still more on medieval "whiteness"

by KARL STEELI'd call this post White Skin, White Mask if the title hadn't already been taken many times. Before you go any further, if you haven't... read more »
From: In the Middle on 18 January 2016

Fixed? Welby, Francis and the Easter Date

On Saturday, news spread that the Most Rev Justin Welby, archbishop of Canterbury, was in discussions ‘to fix the date of Easter’. This followed... read more »
From: merovingianworld on 18 January 2016

Elves and Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts

Recently, three beautiful Mercian prayerbooks from the late 8th and early 9th century have been uploaded to Digitised Manuscripts. These manuscripts, which... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 18 January 2016

Reannouncing Inheriting Rome

All in the display somewhere except the older of the cartwheel pennies!Probably only one person reads my blog so closely as to notice this, but the backlog... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 17 January 2016

Protestant names: Old Testament influences on women’s names

In our previous post we highlighted three types of names which are distinctly Protestant, by which we mean that the majority of them came into use (or... read more »