Post Archives

Archives for December 2015

A Calendar Page for January 2016

Many thanks to all of you who voted to help us choose our 2016 calendar; we are pleased to present you with the winner – the Bedford Hours. The Bedford... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 1 January 2016

2015 (personal retrospect)

some favorite pictures taken from airplanes this yearby J J CohenA great many things happened this year, some of them good, some of them bad (hashtags #mixedbag and #GregoryofTours). It... read more »
From: In the Middle on 31 December 2015

An Anglo-Saxon Anecdote: How Hengest was led by the nose

Alfred and the cakes, Cnut and the waves, and Eadmer the flying monk: Anglo-Saxon history is full of anecdotes. On this blog I will regularly highlight... read more »
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 31 December 2015

An onomastic calendar: December

December 1: Anna Komnene was born in 1083. December 2: Gerard Mercator died in 1594. December 3: Berengar I was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 915. December... read more »

Party Like It's AD 999 (or 980)

This week, many people are planning parties. In the late 10th century, some reforming monks took their cues from the Romans when it came to partying. In... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 31 December 2015

Seminar CCXXVI: Ottoman professional network maintenance

Returning in somewhat subdued fashion to my seminar report backlog finds me still somewhat out of area, as you can probably tell from the title. My tenure... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 30 December 2015

Nicknames: The English element

We have by no means exhausted the possibilities when it comes to discussing medieval nicknames, so we will probably revisit this topic again in spring!... read more »

two, four, six, eight, a stanza to appreciate…

The popularity of seven-line rhyme royal stanzas in late medieval and early Tudor verse means that it’s easy to overlook eight-line stanzas, especially... read more »
From: Stylisticienne on 29 December 2015

Signs of the End Times, or, Rock’n’Roll is Dead

This was not what I had planned for this post, but as has regrettably happened often before events outstrip my backlog. The unthinkable has happened: Lemmy,... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 29 December 2015

Abraham and the Angels: The Cotton Genesis at the British Museum

The miniature of Abraham and the angels from the Cotton Genesis is one of the first items on display in the exhibition Egypt: faith after the pharaohs... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 29 December 2015

Nicknames: Latinate diminutives in -el, -et, -in, -on, -ot

In this post, we look at a collection of diminutive suffixes: -el, -et, -in, -on, -ot, and their feminine forms. Withycombe calls them French [1], and... read more »

Seafaring: an early medieval conference on the islands of the North Atlantic CFP

a guest post by Dan RemeinSeafaring: an early medieval conference on the islands of the North Atlantic - November 3-5, 2016Hi ITM readers.With Donna Beth... read more »
From: In the Middle on 28 December 2015

From Mass Surveillance to Haggis: Medieval News Roundup

What we found this week in our online wanderings...[View the story "From Mass Surveillance to Haggis: Medieval News Roundup" on Storify]Our photo of the... read more »
From: Medieval News on 28 December 2015

Yes. Let's start.

possible cover for the bookby J J CohenSo Lindy sent the last letter in our Earth book to me last night, December 25, a festival of light and life against... read more »
From: In the Middle on 26 December 2015

Nicknames: The diversity of Italy

We’ll report on the DMNES team’s trip to Bolzano in an upcoming post, but today we’re going to investigate Italy in a different way!... read more »

The Word made Flesh

Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Cod. 2554 Han, fol. 15r (Scan #35).In His power, God the Father sends God the Son to the Earth among the worldly.... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 24 December 2015

All That Glitters, Experiment 1

Almost the last academic thing I did last year before breaking for Christmas was the first two sessions of a project that is now nearly finished, All That... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 24 December 2015

The Medieval in Middle-Earth: Rings of Power

As a professor of Anglo-Saxon at the University of Oxford, J. R. R. Tolkien could not help but be inspired by the language and literature he studied and... read more »
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 24 December 2015

Some Carols for Christmas Eve

A monk and nun playing music (BL Royal 2 B VII, f.177) Advent is gone, Christmas is come; Be we merry now, all and some! He is not wise that will be dumb... read more »
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 24 December 2015

Christmas Eve Shepherds' Party

Every Christmas we publish gorgeous images of the Nativity from our manuscripts: tranquil scenes of the stable in Bethlehem, with the Christ child in the... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 24 December 2015

Fox tails

Roman de Renart. Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Français 12584, fol. 11v. read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 23 December 2015

Seminar CCXXV: an attempted rehabilitation of the Emperor Honorius

On 28th January 2015, I was once again in the Institute of Historical Research for the Earlier Middle Ages Seminar, which turned out to be one of the more... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 22 December 2015

Christmas Cherries, Untimely Ripeness

by KARL STEELThis morning, I came across this tweet from Mike Becker, with a photo perhaps taken in Heidelberg:That is, "The cherry tree is blooming. Just... read more »
From: In the Middle on 22 December 2015

The monstrous landscape of medieval Lincolnshire

The following very brief post lists a number of field and other local names from Lindsey that make reference to folkloric and monstrous creatures inhabiting... read more »
From: Caitlin Green on 22 December 2015

Anger Prevention

« Maistre Aldebrandins de Sciane : Li livres qui doit iestre apielés la flours et la rose de toute medicine de fisique » Source: gallica.bnf.fr... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 22 December 2015

Bins, Books and Bodian (Preaching): Ælfric and Christmas

For reformed Anglo-Saxon monks, the year began with Advent and Christmas. The Nativity, from the Benedictional of St Æthelwold, England, c. 963-984, Add... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 22 December 2015

The Anglo-Saxon O Antiphons: O Rex Pacifice, O thou true and thou peaceful one

Christ in glory (BL Cotton Vespasian A VIII, f. 2v, 10th century, Winchester) The antiphon for 20 December is 'O clavis David', and you can read the beautiful... read more »
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 20 December 2015

Using Oak Galls to dye wool

A fairly simple way of dyeing cloth in the medieval period was to use oak galls, although I have no idea how often it was done. The tannins within them... read more »
From: distillatio on 20 December 2015

Dots on the line

La grant ystoire de monseignor Tristan Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Français... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 20 December 2015

Nativity

Psautier avec calendrier. Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Latin 10434, fol. 13v. read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 20 December 2015

Medieval Festive Survival Guide

To help you negotiate the festive season, medieval writers, illustrators, and patrons had some useful tips… 1. Ensure the prompt delivery of your Christmas... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 20 December 2015

Double Vision

De la pucele qui vit sa mere en enfer et son pere em paradis. .xiiij xx .xij. Recueil d’anciennes poésies françaises Source: gallica.bnf.fr... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 19 December 2015

Quem quaeritis

Recueil d’anciennes poésies françaises Date d’édition : 1301-1400 Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque de l’Arsenal,... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 19 December 2015

Beat this for impact!

In the English academy it’s all about impact these days, unless it’s all about networks or public engagement, those are very hot too. But mainly... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 19 December 2015

Heritage Sites: Trendy and Not Trendy

    During the course of sorting and optimising hundreds of old photographs in order to be able to use them online, I am beginning to see... read more »
From: Dianne's Medieval Writing on 19 December 2015

Jesus wants me for a sunbeam

Recueil d’anciennes poésies françaises: « Ci endroit conmencent les Enfances nostre sire Jhesu Crist, et parle premierement de... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 19 December 2015

Seminar CXXIV: being more careful about William Rufus

The seminar backlog now moves forward to 21st January 2015, when none other than John Gillingham was speaking to the Earlier Middle Ages Seminar of the... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 18 December 2015

The Anglo-Saxon O Antiphons: O Jerusalem, Vision of Peace

The Virgin and Child (BL Add. 34890, f. 115, 11th century, England) The last week of Advent is the season of the 'O Antiphons'. These texts, used at Vespers... read more »
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 18 December 2015

Christmas 2015 overview

2015 has been a turbulent year for the Anglo-Norman Dictionary, with the unfortunate illness and extremely sad passing away of our General Editor, Prof.... read more »
From: Anglo-Norman words on 18 December 2015

X-Rays Expose a Hidden Medieval Library

Readers of this blog probably know that early-modern book bindings contain hidden treasure: fragments cut from medieval manuscripts, ranging from... read more »
From: medievalbooks on 18 December 2015

Nicknames in medieval Estonia

In our previous post, we surveyed the percentage of diminutive and hypocoristic forms in the Dictionary’s dataset sorted according to modern countries,... read more »

Anglo-Saxon props: Three TV series and films that use early medieval objects

In order to make their film sets conform to the historical periods they are supposed to depict, designers often draw inspiration from actual, historical... read more »
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 17 December 2015

Entrevista a mi en Català

The seminar reports are catching up but reports on my other activity seem still to be mired in busy busy November 2014. At the very end of that month,... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 17 December 2015

Perceval and the tardis

Lancelot du Lac, la Quête du Saint-Graal et la Mort d’Arthus [de GAUTIER MAP]. Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France,... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 17 December 2015

Medieval Star Wars

It can hardly have escaped your notice that a rather major feature film opened across the world this week. We all are awash in the sights, sounds, and... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 17 December 2015

Seminar CCXXIII: hackweights, cut coins and secret knowledge in Viking England

Sing hallelujah, for I have brought my seminar reporting backlog under a year again at last! Witness: the date of the seminar involved in this post is... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 16 December 2015

You want nicknames? We got nicknames!

In dictionary entries, we sort our citations by modern day country borders (because trying to ascertain which country certain towns were in at which period... read more »

Images from Montserrat!

Readers who’ve been here a little while may remember that since about 2012 I have been mounting a sporadic attempt to quantify and locate the various... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 15 December 2015

Help Us Choose our 2016 Calendar

It has long been a tradition on our blog, hailing back to the distant days of 2011, to highlight pages from a medieval calendar throughout the year. We... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 15 December 2015

Dear Colleagues, Most of you need no introduction to the splendid work of the Dictionary of Old English...

Dear Colleagues, Most of you need no introduction to the splendid work of the Dictionary of Old English and its importance to the work of Anglo-Saxonists... read more »
From: The Ruminate on 14 December 2015