Post Archives

Archives for April 2016

Tout se congnoistra

Recueil de poésies moralisantes, anonyme, en vers. Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits,... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 1 May 2016

Trinity with cherubim

Guillaume de Lorris et Jean de Meun, Le Roman de la rose ; Le Testament, le Codicille et le Trésor attribués à Jean de Meun. Source:... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 1 May 2016

Margin with a twist

1° Les quinze Douleurs de Notre-Seigneur. Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Français... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 1 May 2016

Chained harbor

Recueil de textes historiques (1449-1453/1454) ; — Récit de la prise de Constantinople (1453) ; — Chronique en vers (1244-1392). Source:... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 1 May 2016

Say it with your hair

Guillaume de Digulleville, Le Pèlerinage de la vie humaine ; Le Pèlerinage de l’âme ; Le Pèlerinage de Jésus-Christ.... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 1 May 2016

A Calendar Page for May 2016

For more information about the Bedford Hours, please see our post for January 2016; for more on medieval calendars in general, our original calendar post... read more »

An Onomastic Calendar: April

April 1: Eleanor of Aquitaine died in 1204. April 2: Baldwin I of Jerusalem died in 1118. April 3: Edward the Confessor was crowned king of England in... read more »

Fit for a King’s Sister

Looking for a story about an exiled princess who married a count called Drogo? Forget Daenerys: the real story revolves around Godgifu. Initial B from... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 30 April 2016

Some Romano-British objects found in Europe & North Africa

Previous posts on this site have discussed a variety of material found in Britain that is suggestive of long-distance trade and movement in the past. For... read more »
From: Caitlin Green on 29 April 2016

Mentoring Initiatives in Medieval Studies: Kalamazoo Deadlines Today and Tomorrow!

by Mary Kate Hurley One of the things I’ve always said about medieval studies as an area of expertise is that the mentoring one gets in this field... read more »
From: In the Middle on 29 April 2016

Lǣce Hwā: Doctor Who in Anglo-Saxon England

The TARDIS occasionally found its way to early medieval England and these visits of the nation’s most beloved ‘Time Lord’ can also teach... read more »
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 29 April 2016

The Secrets of Medieval Fonts

One of the fundamental things in a medieval book is letters – those symbols that fill up page after page and that make up meaning. Each... read more »
From: medievalbooks on 29 April 2016

Devils dawdling

Guillaume de Digulleville, Le Pèlerinage de la vie humaine ; Le Pèlerinage de l’âme ; Le Pèlerinage de Jésus-Christ.... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 29 April 2016

Medieval face off

Guillaume de Digulleville, Le Pèlerinage de la vie humaine ; Le Pèlerinage de l’âme ; Le Pèlerinage de Jésus-Christ.... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 29 April 2016

Pope Leo of Bourges

One of the firmest proponents of judicial “benefit of clergy” in the ninth century was the great archbishop Hincmar (when it suited him,... read more »
From: Turbulent Priests on 28 April 2016

Who’s coming to dinner

Percheval le Gallois [par CRESTIEN DE TROYES ], avec continuation par « GAUCHIER DE DORDAN ». Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 28 April 2016

Medieval Muteness

by KARL STEELFirst, congrats Jeffrey on your excellent review, cited below. And second, GOOD LUCK to all prepping for Kalamazoo: may your papers cohere... read more »
From: In the Middle on 25 April 2016

Dressed to the nines

Exploring the nine-line stanza in Middle English is a good lesson in what sort of identities stanza-forms can have.  If you search for nine-line stanzas... read more »
From: Stylisticienne on 25 April 2016

Mystery Monday: Mandina

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet.... read more »

The Duchess’s Dialogue: Writing and Reading Margaret of York’s Le Dyalogue de la Duchesse

Image of Le Dyalogue’s frontispiece “My God, my creator, my redeemer, illuminate my interior eyes.” So begins the main text of Le Dyalogue... read more »

Remembering the Past: The History Behind Game of Thrones

‘We watch. We listen. And we remember. The past is already written. The ink is dry.’ So speaks the Three-eyed Raven to Bran Stark in a trailer... read more »
From: Dr Sarah Peverley on 25 April 2016

Gears of Fortune

Guillaume de Machaut, Poésies: Jugement du roi de Bohème, dit Jugement du roi de Behaigne (1-22v), Remède de Fortune (23-58v), Dit... read more »
From: Manuscript Art on 25 April 2016

Stone: An Ecology of the Inhuman reviewed in Choice

by J J CohenA nice, quick review of Stone: An Ecology of the Inhuman appears in the latest issue of Choice magazine (under "Philosophy" -- that is a first... read more »
From: In the Middle on 24 April 2016

What's With Medieval Tombs? Part 19: Animals on Tombs (2)

  The first posting on this topic examined some of the generic types of animals depicted on tombs and what they signified in general terms. In this... read more »
From: Dianne's Medieval Writing on 24 April 2016

Chag Sameach

by J J CohenWishing all those who celebrate a happy Passover.Here is the shirt I am wearing as we prep our seder. read more »
From: In the Middle on 23 April 2016

1000th Anniversary of the Death of Æthelred the Unready

Today marks the 1000th anniversary of the death of King Æthelred II (reigned 978-1016). Æthelred II—often nicknamed Æthelred the ‘Unready’, from... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 23 April 2016

The Illustrated Old English Hexateuch: An early medieval picture book

This blog post focuses on one of the most extensively illustrated books from the Middle Ages: The Illustrated Old English Hexateuch (The British Library,... read more »
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 22 April 2016

For Earth Day: on viewing a home planet at great distance

by J J CohenScience enacts knowledge that we have long had: that the round Earth, should we ever be able to look back upon it, would be beautiful. Or so... read more »
From: In the Middle on 22 April 2016

New Shoots and Tree Roots

Apologies for the lack of activity. I have been chronically unwell (again). That, coupled with the shear volume of material I had collected, and unfortunately... read more »

Towards a more progressive medieval studies (and a more humane humanities)

by J J CohenI want to share with you two recent statements published by medieval studies communities. Affirmative and condemnatory in careful measure,... read more »
From: In the Middle on 20 April 2016

Arthurian names: Ambrose/Emrys

By Anonymous, C15th – Original MS held by Lambeth Palace Library, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9510186 Our most... read more »

A Firsthand Experience: Great Writers' Handwriting

Christian Dior once claimed that one could tell more about a person from her perfume than from her handwriting, but we in the Medieval Manuscripts section... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 20 April 2016

Cheesesteaks and Brownstones: Manuscript Viewings in Philadelphia and NYC

Having just returned from a research trip to the States, I thought that I would give my blog a kick, as it has gone into hibernation of late. Jet-lag and... read more »
From: The Scribe Unbound on 19 April 2016

Casting into powder, a method from Biringuccio

Something I’ve been wanting to try since last year is casting into powder to make small objects, which is an interesting thing to test for real experimental... read more »
From: My medieval foundry on 18 April 2016

Mystery Monday: Lowko

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet.... read more »

Word of the Month: April showers

‘Sweete April showers, Doo spring Maie flowers’[1]. From the late 16th century, Brits appear to have hoped that poor weather in the month of... read more »
From: Anglo-Norman words on 18 April 2016

A new find of a tenth-century Anglo-Saxon cross with the figure of Christ from Louth, Lincolnshire

This aim of this post is simply to report the rather exciting discovery of two joining pieces from a tenth-century Anglo-Saxon standing cross in the rectory... read more »
From: Caitlin Green on 18 April 2016

What's With Medieval Tombs? Part 18: Animals on Tombs (1)

  Animals have a lively history in medieval art, depicted naturalistically, stylistically and in ways that seem quite nonsensical. As with most things... read more »
From: Dianne's Medieval Writing on 17 April 2016

Britain, the Byzantine Empire, and the concept of an Anglo-Saxon 'Heptarchy': Harun ibn Yahya's ninth-century Arabic description of Britain

The aim of the following post is to offer a draft look at an interesting Arabic account of early medieval Britain that appears to have its origins in the... read more »
From: Caitlin Green on 17 April 2016

Sir Hans Sloane: Collector, Marmoset-Owner and Chocolate-Populariser

by Mary Wellesley Michael Rysbrack's bust of Hans Sloane in the British Library Today is the anniversary of the birth of Sir Hans Sloane (b. 1660, d.1753),... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 16 April 2016

The Danish Conquest, Part 9

1016 in the D version of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (BL Cotton Tiberius B IV, f. 66) 1016 was a dramatic year in England. On this blog we've been marking... read more »
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 15 April 2016

In Marca Hispanica XXXI: contacts, changes of plan and a main-street hermitage

I said last post but one that I would clarify my itinerary on last year’s trip to Catalonia, because it wasn’t very simple. This was so for... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 13 April 2016

[This announcement is on behalf of the BABEL Working Group Steering Committee]2016 Winners of James J....

[This announcement is on behalf of the BABEL Working Group Steering Committee]2016 Winners of James J. Paxson Memorial Travel GrantThe BABEL Working Group... read more »
From: In the Middle on 12 April 2016

dit, dit(i)e and ditee

dit, dit(i)e and ditee (noun) The various dictionary entries give a sense of the overlap between these terms, and also the range of general and specific... read more »
From: Stylisticienne on 12 April 2016

Digital Humanities: a fairy tale? (Guest Post)

We’re very pleased to host our first guest post here on the blog. After our recent post Digital Humanities: Challenges, Difficulties, Reflections,... read more »

Learning from an ailing emperor

The last two posts have involved rather a lot of me getting things wrong in a more or less embarrassing fashion, including about stuff I’ve either... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 11 April 2016

Mystery Monday: Kadold

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet.... read more »

DePauw Dialogue 2.0

Last Wednesday, DePauw University hosted its second Day of Dialogue, in which the campus becomes the classroom and the entire community comes together... read more »
From: Medieval Meets World on 11 April 2016

The Tripping Saint?

Today is the feast day of St Guthlac, a 7th-century saint from the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia. Guthlac was a warrior in the Mercian border-lands who,... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 11 April 2016

Islamic gold dinars in late eleventh- and twelfth-century England

The following post offers a map and brief discussion of the Islamic gold coins of the later eleventh and twelfth centuries that have been found in England... read more »
From: Caitlin Green on 10 April 2016