Post Archives

Archives for July 2013

Saint Aldhelm

He was an abbot. A teacher. A writer in both poetry and prose. And he took an interest in a particular science. He was "the first ...Read Full Post read more »
From: Medieval History on 1 August 2013

In the News

Four very different discoveries await in this week's news. Early sketch of Stonehenge found The sketch was discovered in a manuscript dating to 1440,... read more »
From: Medieval History on 1 August 2013

A Calendar Page for August 2013

For more details on calendar pages or the Golf Book, please see the post for January 2013. The aristocratic pursuits which have so characterised this manuscript... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 1 August 2013

Stock Medievalism

There was an illuminating “Room for Debate” exchange in the New York Times yesterday on the subject of “Resuscitating Chivalry,”... read more »
From: Burnable Books on 31 July 2013

CFP: Revisiting the Legacy of Boethius in the Middle Ages

Harvard University, March 13-15, 2014For the conference website, please click here.  The legacy of Boethius in the Middle Ages has been enjoying a... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 30 July 2013

CFP: Religious Men in the Middle Ages: Networks and Communities

3-5 July 2014 University of Lincoln, UKCall for PapersThis conference seeks to explore and re-evaluate the forms and functions of networks and communities... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 30 July 2013

CFP: Suffragette Legacy: How Does the History of Feminism Inspire Current Thinking in Manchester?

Saturday 8 March 2014Call for PapersFrom The Village and David Bowie’s Suffragette City to Femen activists and Pussy Riot, the suffragette legacy is... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 30 July 2013

Howey, “Wool,” and a Pretty Good Two Years

A few weeks ago I read Hugh Howey’s incredible novel Wool, almost by accident (a relative had given it to my thirteen-year-old for his birthday,... read more »
From: Burnable Books on 30 July 2013

The Last Will and Testament of Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great (871-899) and Eadred (946-955) are the only Anglo-Saxon kings whose wills have survived to the present day, both of which are found in... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 29 July 2013

When Is a Product of Research Ready for Public Release?

By now, many readers will probably be aware of the debate surrounding the recent release of the American Historical Society's Statement on Policies... read more »
From: Modern Medieval on 28 July 2013

"Trading Tongues" is HERE!

by JONATHAN HSYI’m pleased to announce that today is the official release date of my book, Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval... read more »
From: In the Middle on 28 July 2013

Art History Resource at Princeton

Thanks to Genevra Kornbluth of Kornbluth Photography for posting this to the Mediev-L discussion group. Princeton University has started electronically... read more »
From: Medieval History Geek on 27 July 2013

The Boss (with apologies to Bruce Springsteen)

Today I had the opportunity to visit the archaeological excavations being undertaken at Holt Castle (Longitude 53.077958; Latitude -2.880319). Of the Lordship... read more »

Reading Medieval Script: Three (not-so) Easy Steps!

By Jenny Weston Medieval manuscripts are often beautiful to look at. With their strange letter-forms, their often gold-plated initials, and their aged... read more »
From: medievalfragments on 26 July 2013

Doctors can now figure out if you have the Black Death; and more medieval news

In a development that could have been very useful over six hundred years ago, scientists have discovered a simple and effective way of determining if... read more »
From: Medieval News on 25 July 2013

Hengist and Horsa

They stand tall in the early history of England: legendary brothers who founded the kingdom of Kent. Did they actually exist? They were mentioned in the... read more »
From: Medieval History on 25 July 2013

Tor-ism: medievalists in Glastonbury

The last stop on the medievalists’ mini-tour following last year’s Leeds was Glastonbury. It seems weird that I’d never been to Glastonbury... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 25 July 2013

Some News

This week there's archaeological discoveries and Viking treasures. Viking Jewelry Unearthed in Denmark Lavish goods at a farm site, and Christian items... read more »
From: Medieval History on 25 July 2013

Guess the Manuscript V

The beautiful weather lately has put us all in a gentle summery mood, so we've decided not to inflict another flyleaf mystery on you. Today's installment... read more »
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 25 July 2013

Fifty Shades of Carlos Danger

I’ve decided my next novel will be called “Fifty Shades of Carlos Danger.” Danger will be a sort of good-guy Carlos the Jackal, retired... read more »
From: Burnable Books on 24 July 2013

Expertise and habits of mind: a medievalist’s IPO

In this week’s Chronicle of Higher Education there’s a really wonderful piece by David M. Perry, a medieval historian at Dominican University,... read more »
From: Burnable Books on 24 July 2013

Networks & Neighbors: Exciting New Journal in Early Medieval Studies

by EILEEN JOYGiven postmedieval's recent issue on Medieval Mobilities, and our interests here at In The Middle in actor-network theory, post-human studies,... read more »
From: In the Middle on 23 July 2013

Fall 2013 Events

We are still putting our fall and spring calendar together, but here are three dates for your calendar:SEPT 6: Mike Witmore, GW MEMSI / Dean's Scholars... read more »
From: GW MEMSI on 23 July 2013

Call for Papers: Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics at Kalamazoo 2014

Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics at the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) May... read more »
From: Modern Medieval on 23 July 2013

Dates and battles: the sack of Manresa, maybe-997

It’s not just me that’s remarked on the absence of narrative sources from the south-west of Europe around the turn of the year 1000, and for... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 23 July 2013

Well-being and the Academic

We all know that one of the secrets of a fruitful mind is a healthy body. I know that. When I was a Ph.D. student up in Yorkshire, I used to cherish weekends... read more »
From: The Scribe Unbound on 22 July 2013

Voices on the Medieval Page (2): The Scribe

By Erik Kwakkel (@erik_kwakkel) This is the second part of a series highlighting instances where medieval individuals added information to an existing... read more »
From: medievalfragments on 22 July 2013

A Carolingian Masterpiece: the Moutier-Grandval Bible

On Christmas Day of the year 800, Charlemagne, King of the Franks, was crowned Europe’s first Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Leo III. Many people, including... read more »
From: Medieval manuscripts blog on 22 July 2013

An Attempt to Buck the Trend

Dolbadarn Castle (Latitude 53.116526; Longitude -4.114234) sits on a promontory above two lakes, the Padarn and the Peris, with the village of Llanberis... read more »

My Secret Pearl Without a Spot Sightings: Plymouth Meeting Mall

On a winter morning earlier this year, I was reading Pearl on the 27 bus. I was headed to the mall to make a connection with the 98 bus so I could get... read more »
From: tolde by the weye on 21 July 2013

In praise of Wells Cathedral

Sorry for the gap between posts, the times they are dispiriting; I shall return to happier ones. The second step on that short medievalist tour I and two... read more »
From: A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe on 21 July 2013

Royal Babies and Celebrated Infants

With all of the excitement surrounding the impending arrival of England’s newest Royal baby, it seems like a good opportunity to have a look at the medieval... read more »
From: Medieval manuscripts blog on 19 July 2013

CFP: 15th Global Conference: Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness

Saturday 22nd March – Monday 24th March 2014Prague, Czech RepublicCall for PresentationsThis inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 18 July 2013

CFP: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2014

9‐11 JanuaryThe University of WinchesterGender and StatusKeynote speaker: Barbara Yorke, Professor Emerita of Early Medieval History, University of Winchester... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 18 July 2013

New in the Glossary

The Medieval History Glossary continues to grow. Here are some recently-added terms: Adamites The Code of Justinian Kent Naifty The Treaty of Verdun Follow... read more »
From: About.com Medieval History on 17 July 2013

OUT NOW: Free to Write: Prison Voices Past and Present (Headland)

Foreword by Erwin JamesEdited by Gareth Creer, Hannah Priest and Tamsin SpargoBlurb:"The Free to Write Project has demonstrated that the long, rich and... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 17 July 2013

OUT NOW: Noir Carnival (Fox Spirit Books)

Edited by K.A. LaityBlurb: Carnival: whether you picture it as a traveling fair in the back roads of America or the hedonistic nights of the pre-Lenten... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 17 July 2013

News Bits

This week there's news about archaeology, modern warfare, vampires, and one of the most important documents ever written. Excavations at Yoros Castle... read more »
From: About.com Medieval History on 17 July 2013

Follow the British Library

This blog promotes the British Library's medieval manuscripts collections -- but did you know that there are many other ways to follow the British Library's... read more »
From: Medieval manuscripts blog on 17 July 2013

'Vampires' in Poland, 'Medieval Mystery' site in England - what archaeologists are finding

Two recent archaeological stories are getting some media attention. First, in southern Poland a graveyard was discovered that contained four skeletons... read more »
From: Medieval News on 16 July 2013

Carolingian Thought for the Day

In February, the IHR Earlier Medieval Seminar heard Zubin Mistry from UCL talk about "Thinking about abortion under the Carolingians". As Zubin explained... read more »
From: Magistra et Mater on 16 July 2013

CFP: Ghosts, Gremlins and Jedi: Fantasy and Film in the Long 1980s

Manchester, United Kingdom Friday 25th – Saturday 26th April 2014Call for PapersFrom sci-fi epic to swords and sorcery, from urban ghosts to time travel,... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 16 July 2013

The Future We Want: Field Change / Discipline Change

a guest post by ANNE F. HARRIS and KAREN EILEEN OVERBEYBelow, as a special preview of an upcoming Oliphaunt / punctum collaboration, you will find an extraordinary... read more »
From: In the Middle on 16 July 2013

Impossible Spaces Book Trailer

The video trailer for Impossible Spaces, published by Hic Dragones and edited by me! The music, written especially for the trailer, is by the awesome Digital... read more »
From: She-Wolf on 16 July 2013

Jane Austen’s Last (Written) Words: On St. Swithun’s Day

Today is July 15, St. Swithun’s Day: a day for thinking about weather, poetry, and Jane Austen. Why weather? There’s an old English tradition... read more »
From: Burnable BooksBurnable Books on 15 July 2013

Magna Cartas to be Unified for First Time

The British Library, Lincoln Cathedral and Salisbury Cathedral are delighted to announce that their copies of Magna Carta, issued by King John in 1215,... read more »
From: Medieval manuscripts blog on 15 July 2013

Please fund my Cutting Edge PhD Research…

Funding. Apparently even in these times of austerity it is available for cutting edge research…unless of course the people holding the purse strings... read more »

The Difficult Marriage of Njörd and Skaði

In Norse Myth there is a minor tale about the marriage of Njörd and Skaði. Njörd was from the sea and Skaði was from the mountains. They met in Asgard... read more »
From: tolde by the weye on 14 July 2013

Clement of Alexandria – Gesundheit

As I continue on my Early Christianity Reading Journey, I’m currently in the middle of reading Clement of Alexandria, who lived from about 150-215.... read more »
From: Medieval History Geek on 13 July 2013

Contradictio in terminis

“Oxford out of term time was wrapped in a quiet and sensitive beauty…” Dorothy L. Sayers, ‘Gaudy Night’. Filed under: Uncategorized read more »
From: In Thirteenth Century England on 13 July 2013