Search Results for "English"

Your search for posts with tags/categories containing English found 285 posts

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Mystery Monday: Josine/Josina

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin,...

Word of the month: Some Italianisms in the Port Books of Southampton

A map of medieval Southampton based on the Terrier of 1454: http://3dvisa.cch.kcl.ac.uk/paper_jones.htmlMy previous AND blog [July 2016] on luxury fabric colours introduced the study of Anglo-Norman...
From: Anglo-Norman words on 21 Oct 2016

Remembering Assandun with Emma

It has been a busy week of anniversaries of early medievalists with an interest in north-western Europe. Last week was the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings. This week starts off with the anniversary...
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 18 Oct 2016

And Always After That It Grew Much Worse

14 October 2016 marks the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings. It is sometimes said that ‘winners write the history books’. However, some recently digitised accounts of the Battle of Hastings...
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 13 Oct 2016

Beowulf vs the Dragon: A Student Doodle Edition

For a bonus question on one of my Old English literature exams, my students used their artistic talents to draw scenes from the concluding fight in the Old English poem Beowulf. Together, these doodles...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 9 Oct 2016

acrostic, abece, poyse

Three terms for the price of one in this blog post.  An abece (or an abc) is a poem where each line or each stanza (or even each word in a stanza, in one particularly jazzy Latin example) begins with...
From: Stylisticienne on 27 Sep 2016

caesura

This technical term provides a good example of the mis-named, the loosely-defined, the nameless and the only-belatedly-named in Middle English poetics.  It’s a word sometimes flung about by...
From: Stylisticienne on 19 Sep 2016

The Kingis Quair

A sneak preview of part of a work in progress, though I promise you that other blog posts will be very soon on their way (including all you might ever want to know about the caesura in Middle English poetry)....
From: Stylisticienne on 13 Sep 2016

Anglo-Saxon apps: Old English on your smartphone

In this blog post, I review five apps that bring the early medieval magic of Old English to your 21st-century smartphone. I am not in any way connected to the developers of these apps. Let’s get...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 4 Sep 2016

An Anglo-Saxon Anecdote: The Battle of the Birds, 671

Alfred and the cakes, Cnut and the waves, and Eadmer the flying monk: Anglo-Saxon history is full of anecdotes. On this blog I will regularly highlight some amusing and/or remarkable episodes from early...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 26 Aug 2016

Sitting down in early medieval England: A catalogue of Anglo-Saxon chairs

After fighting their battles, tending to their fields, playing their harps, herding their cows and singing their Psalms, many an Anglo-Saxon would feel the need to put their feet up...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 18 Aug 2016

Research Curator, Renaissance Literature

We have a job opportunity here at the British Library, to work on our Discovering Literature online resource, in the field of Renaissance Literature. This is a full time, fixed term contract, for a period...
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 16 Aug 2016

'On hærfeste ham gelædeð': Anglo-Saxon Harvests

Harvesting sheaves in the Eadwine Psalter (Cambridge, Trinity College, R.17.1, f.232), illustrating Psalm 125/6 In some early medieval calendars, including those followed by the learned scholars of Anglo-Saxon...
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 7 Aug 2016

“A conspicuous specimen of Anglosaxon poetry”: A student summary of Beowulf from 1880

At the end of the nineteenth century, Dutch schoolmaster G. J. P. J. Bolland studied older Germanic languages with a particular interest in Old English. He studied under Eduard Sievers in Jena, Germany,...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 3 Aug 2016

Death of the Middle English Virelai

Just a quick post to say that my article on a group of fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century lyrics which in the past were misidentified as Middle English virelais has been published in Medium Ævum 85.1...
From: Stylisticienne on 31 Jul 2016

Word of the Month: Sky blue, peacock blue, indigo and luxury fabric colours

As part of my PhD thesis, I have been researching language contact between Anglo-Norman and dialects of medieval Italian.The AND currently only has five entries labelled as Italianisms: comyt< It. comito...
From: Anglo-Norman words on 28 Jul 2016

The Marvels of the East: An early medieval Pokédex

Pikachus, Togepis, Flareons, Charmanders and Bulbasaurs. These days, the World seems obsessed with Pokémon GO. However, this fancy for exotic monsters with special powers is...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 24 Jul 2016

Form and Fashion in Lancastrian Poems

Here’s the text of the short talk I’m giving as part of a Roundtable discussion (Session 5D) on ‘After Chaucer’ at the New Chaucer Society Congress on Tuesday afternoon. In...
From: Stylisticienne on 12 Jul 2016

Mystery Monday: Wikerun

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin,...

Word of the Month: body-parts ‘canel’, ‘canole’, ‘eskanel’, ‘chanel’, and which is which?

Part of the current revision process of the Anglo-Norman Dictionary (www.anglo-norman.net) is the provision of (live) links to other relevant dictionaries for every single entry. This places all Anglo-Norman...
From: Anglo-Norman words on 30 Jun 2016

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