Search Results for "Old English"

Your search for posts with tags/categories containing Old English found 51 posts

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Beowulf vs the Dragon: A Student Doodle Edition

For a bonus question on one of my Old English literature exams, my students used their artistic talents to draw scenes from the concluding fight in the Old English poem Beowulf. Together, these doodles...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 9 Oct 2016

Anglo-Saxon apps: Old English on your smartphone

In this blog post, I review five apps that bring the early medieval magic of Old English to your 21st-century smartphone. I am not in any way connected to the developers of these apps. Let’s get...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 4 Sep 2016

An Anglo-Saxon Anecdote: The Battle of the Birds, 671

Alfred and the cakes, Cnut and the waves, and Eadmer the flying monk: Anglo-Saxon history is full of anecdotes. On this blog I will regularly highlight some amusing and/or remarkable episodes from early...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 26 Aug 2016

Sitting down in early medieval England: A catalogue of Anglo-Saxon chairs

After fighting their battles, tending to their fields, playing their harps, herding their cows and singing their Psalms, many an Anglo-Saxon would feel the need to put their feet up...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 18 Aug 2016

'On hærfeste ham gelædeð': Anglo-Saxon Harvests

Harvesting sheaves in the Eadwine Psalter (Cambridge, Trinity College, R.17.1, f.232), illustrating Psalm 125/6 In some early medieval calendars, including those followed by the learned scholars of Anglo-Saxon...
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 7 Aug 2016

“A conspicuous specimen of Anglosaxon poetry”: A student summary of Beowulf from 1880

At the end of the nineteenth century, Dutch schoolmaster G. J. P. J. Bolland studied older Germanic languages with a particular interest in Old English. He studied under Eduard Sievers in Jena, Germany,...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 3 Aug 2016

The Marvels of the East: An early medieval Pokédex

Pikachus, Togepis, Flareons, Charmanders and Bulbasaurs. These days, the World seems obsessed with Pokémon GO. However, this fancy for exotic monsters with special powers is...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 24 Jul 2016

Mystery Monday: Wikerun

Every Monday we will post an entry that hasn’t yet been published with a view towards harnessing the collective onomastic power of the internet. If you have any thoughts about the name’s origin,...

Seeing naked fathers in Anglo-Saxon England

In honour of Father’s Day (19-06-2016), this blog post calls attention to three Anglo-Saxon responses to the story of Ham seeing his father Noah’s nakedness (Genesis 9:21-25). This intriguing...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 19 Jun 2016

The Battle of Maldon: A Student Doodle Edition

For a bonus question on one of my Old English literature exams, my students used their artistic talents to draw scenes from The Battle of Maldon. Together, these doodles cover almost the entire poem...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 10 Jun 2016

Henry Sweet: One of the Founding Fathers of Old English Studies

Henry Sweet (1845-1912) was a remarkable scholar who laid some of the foundations for the academic study of Old English. This blog provides an overview of Sweet’s publications with respect to...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 29 May 2016

Lǣce Hwā: Doctor Who and Alfred the Great

The TARDIS occasionally found its way to early medieval England and these visits of the nation’s most beloved ‘Time Lord’ can also teach us something about Anglo-Saxon history and the...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 4 May 2016

Benjamin Thorpe: The Man Who Translated Almost All Old English Texts

Not much is known about Benjamin Thorpe (1782-1870), yet he was one of the first scholars to publish voluminous editions and translations of Old English texts. This blog provides an overview of Thorpe’s...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 8 Apr 2016

The Freoðuwebbe and the Freswael: A Comic Strip Reconstruction of the Finnsburg Fragment and Episode

One of the most intriguing stories referred to in Old English heroic poetry is whatever happend at Finnsburg, between Hnæf , Finn and Hengest. The story is referred to in Beowulf, the so-called Finnsburg...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 16 Mar 2016

The Language of Anglo-Saxon Love

A long, long time ago, back in the early days of this blog (2011) I wrote two not-entirely-serious posts compiling some lists of Medieval Compliments and Medieval Terms of Endearment. To my surprise and...
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 13 Feb 2016

A brief note on Britons and wealhstodas

The following is just a very quick post about the historically interesting Old English word wealhstod, 'translator' or 'interpreter' (plural wealhstodas), which is used of a variety of people including...
From: Caitlin Green on 11 Feb 2016

Bins, Books and Bodian (Preaching): Ælfric and Christmas

For reformed Anglo-Saxon monks, the year began with Advent and Christmas. The Nativity, from the Benedictional of St Æthelwold, England, c. 963-984, Add MS 49598, f. 15v. Although Easter was considered...
From: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts on 22 Dec 2015

The Anglo-Saxon O Antiphons: O Jerusalem, Vision of Peace

The Virgin and Child (BL Add. 34890, f. 115, 11th century, England) The last week of Advent is the season of the 'O Antiphons'. These texts, used at Vespers in the days before Christmas, have an enduring...
From: A Clerk of Oxford on 18 Dec 2015

What if Shakespeare DID write Old English?

Whenever I tell people I study and teach Old English, they react by feeding me their favourite lines of Shakespeare, noting that it is very difficult indeed: “Is this a dagger I see before me? Alas,...
From: Dutch Anglo-Saxonist on 26 Nov 2015

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