Search Results for "glossary"

Your search for posts with tags/categories containing glossary found 27 posts

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acrostic, abece, poyse

Three terms for the price of one in this blog post.  An abece (or an abc) is a poem where each line or each stanza (or even each word in a stanza, in one particularly jazzy Latin example) begins with...
From: Stylisticienne on 27 Sep 2016

caesura

This technical term provides a good example of the mis-named, the loosely-defined, the nameless and the only-belatedly-named in Middle English poetics.  It’s a word sometimes flung about by...
From: Stylisticienne on 19 Sep 2016

geste (n), gesten (vb.)

geste (n), gesten (vb.) This noun and verb are derived from Latin gesta and French geste, referring both to heroic deeds and to the recounting of such deeds.  In Middle English, the noun has more...
From: Stylisticienne on 1 Aug 2016

Internal Rhyme II

My last post looked at Chaucer’s experiments with internal rhyme in Anelida’s Complaint.  Though we think of it as an unfinished minor work, Anelida and Arcite survives in plenty of manuscripts...
From: Stylisticienne on 6 Jun 2016

Internal Rhyme I

This is the first of two or three posts on internal rhyme in later medieval English and Scottish verse.  There is a small craze for internal rhyming in later Middle English and Middle Scots poetry. ...
From: Stylisticienne on 20 May 2016

Dressed to the nines

Exploring the nine-line stanza in Middle English is a good lesson in what sort of identities stanza-forms can have.  If you search for nine-line stanzas in the Digital Index of Middle English Verse,...
From: Stylisticienne on 25 Apr 2016

dit, dit(i)e and ditee

dit, dit(i)e and ditee (noun) The various dictionary entries give a sense of the overlap between these terms, and also the range of general and specific meanings they can communicate.  The Oxford...
From: Stylisticienne on 12 Apr 2016

cadence

cadence (noun) In medieval Latin prose cursus composition, cadences are the patterns of long and short vowels in words and phrases at the ends of clauses.  The Libellus de arte dictandi rhetorice...
From: Stylisticienne on 21 Mar 2016

two, four, six, eight, a stanza to appreciateā€¦

The popularity of seven-line rhyme royal stanzas in late medieval and early Tudor verse means that it’s easy to overlook eight-line stanzas, especially those rhyming ababbcbc.  This verse form...
From: Stylisticienne on 29 Dec 2015

staff

staff noun, staves (plural) In Old English stæf means both ‘staff’ or ‘stick’ and also an individual alphabetic character.  By extension, it also refers to letters...
From: Stylisticienne on 20 Nov 2015

poesie and poetrie

poesie and poetrie, both nouns Glending Olson, in his 1979 essay ‘Making and Poetry in the Age of Chaucer’, showed that poetry in the later Middle Ages predominantly meant writing about ‘classical...
From: Stylisticienne on 8 Nov 2015

refrain and refreit

refrain and refreit (also refreid), both nouns Refrain in Middle French refers to the repeated chorus of a dance-song or carol.  Hence it also refers to the repeated section of music and words...
From: Stylisticienne on 11 Oct 2015

complainte

complainte (noun), also compleinte Complainte usually designates content rather than form: the expression of grief, pain and suffering, a lamentation, a petition or list of grievances.  Complaints...
From: Stylisticienne on 28 Sep 2015

virelai

virelai (noun), also virelay The word virelai appears in Middle English in lists of examples of lyric forms for love poetry, often lists translating or imitating similar lists in French poetry.  Aurelius,...
From: Stylisticienne on 21 Sep 2015

lai

lai (noun), also lay, laye, lei Before I attempt this glossary entry, I concede that there is no wittier definition of lai than that by Jonathan Hsy on Twitter: As per its Middle English Dictionary...
From: Stylisticienne on 13 Sep 2015

fitt

fitt (noun), also fytte, fytt Fitt is used in the Old English translation of Boethius’s De consolatione philosophiae to mean ‘song, verse’.  It re-emerges in Middle English as a...
From: Stylisticienne on 24 Aug 2015

Lenvoy

lenvoy (noun), also lenvoie, lenvoye (1)  The final stanza of a ballade, from the French equivalent term envoi, often with a different number of lines from the stanzas of the main text of the ballade. ...
From: Stylisticienne on 18 Aug 2015

tail-rhyme

tail-rhyme (noun) This term is not used in Middle English, though the term rime couwe is an early fourteenth-century Anglo-Norman equivalent of this modern term.  Rhiannon Purdie in her...
From: Stylisticienne on 15 Jul 2015

couwe

couwe (noun and adjective), also kowe This term, hovering bilingually between English and French, derives from French co(u)é meaning ‘having a tail, tailed’.  It doesn’t seem...
From: Stylisticienne on 15 Jul 2015

roundel

roundel (noun) This English term describes the sixteen-line form which is known in French as the chanson.  The form usually begins with a four-line refrain ABAB which is followed by two further...
From: Stylisticienne on 1 Jul 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms; for example, WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included. However, blog.com (blog.co.uk, blog.de etc) tags are not included, because they don't appear in the blogs' RSS feeds.

It does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts. The category 'uncategorized' is excluded from search results and it should always be borne in mind that not all bloggers use categories/tags.