Search Results for "late Middle English"

Your search for posts with tags/categories containing late Middle English found 41 posts

Showing 1 - 20 of 41

acrostic, abece, poyse

Three terms for the price of one in this blog post.  An abece (or an abc) is a poem where each line or each stanza (or even each word in a stanza, in one particularly jazzy Latin example) begins with...
From: Stylisticienne on 27 Sep 2016

caesura

This technical term provides a good example of the mis-named, the loosely-defined, the nameless and the only-belatedly-named in Middle English poetics.  It’s a word sometimes flung about by...
From: Stylisticienne on 19 Sep 2016

The Kingis Quair

A sneak preview of part of a work in progress, though I promise you that other blog posts will be very soon on their way (including all you might ever want to know about the caesura in Middle English poetry)....
From: Stylisticienne on 13 Sep 2016

Death of the Middle English Virelai

Just a quick post to say that my article on a group of fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century lyrics which in the past were misidentified as Middle English virelais has been published in Medium Ævum 85.1...
From: Stylisticienne on 31 Jul 2016

Form and Fashion in Lancastrian Poems

Here’s the text of the short talk I’m giving as part of a Roundtable discussion (Session 5D) on ‘After Chaucer’ at the New Chaucer Society Congress on Tuesday afternoon. In...
From: Stylisticienne on 12 Jul 2016

A Queenly Prologue & Epilogue

As I explained in a previous post, over New Year’s I stumbled upon a little-noticed prologue, uniquely preserved in London, British Library MS Harley 7578.  It prefaces the Liber Proverbiorum,...
From: Stylisticienne on 19 Feb 2016

A Grumpy Valentine

On Valentine’s Day, of course, a fifteenth-century Valentine’s ballade.  By coincidence, I found this one in the manuscript which preserves the proverbial text translated for Margaret...
From: Stylisticienne on 14 Feb 2016

Fit for a Queen

This post is really just the story of how one thing leads to another in research.  It’s also to tell you about what I’ve been working on in the last three weeks, a sudden and unexpected...
From: Stylisticienne on 25 Jan 2016

Save us, O Lord, from Dithering!

In this guest post, Sheri Smith, postgraduate researcher at Cardiff University, explains the surprising references to Chaucer’s Griselda and Custance in a late fifteenth-century poem. Reading Jenni’s...
From: Stylisticienne on 13 Aug 2015

The Provocative Fifteenth Century Conference

I’m going to be speaking at a conference on ‘The Provocative Fifteenth Century’ at the Huntington Library, San Marino, California in October, organised by Lisa H Cooper and Andrea...
From: Stylisticienne on 11 Aug 2015

What I shall choose,I know not

I have been chasing up various references to poetic terminology in a little anthology from 1953 called Cambridge Middle English Lyrics, edited by Henry A Person.   One of the poems is not very...
From: Stylisticienne on 31 Jul 2015

What a printer said to a manuscript…

I’m still exploring the envoy (or lenvoy in Middle English), a section of dedication, epilogue, parting words or direct address added to a text.  As well as envoys written by poets to their...
From: Stylisticienne on 14 Jul 2015

The Techne of Verse-Making: Poetry’s Termes in Middle English

Tomorrow I’m off to London to attend the Biennial London Chaucer Conference.  I’m speaking on Saturday morning in a session on ‘Literary Technologies’.  The title of my...
From: Stylisticienne on 9 Jul 2015

Go weep with Proserpina…

I’ve been exploring the lenvoye this week, both as a form and as a technical term.  In medieval French poetry, an envoi is the final stanza of a ballade in which the poem is sent on its...
From: Stylisticienne on 21 Jun 2015

Good and Bad Stanzas

Some medieval English playwrights use different types of stanza for different types of characters.
From: Stylisticienne on 7 May 2015

Being Miserable, Fifteenth-Century Style

Feeling blue or winter-sad?  Then this fifteenth-century poem is for you (scroll down for text, slightly modernised, and a translation).  It’s a hidden gem, I think, not widely anthologised.  It...
From: Stylisticienne on 13 Jan 2015

Sick as a bit of Chaucerian doggerel?

This morning lots of us will be waking up with Christmas party hangovers (not me, our Christmas Dinner at St Edmund Hall isn’t till next weekend…).  To help distract those so afflicted from...
From: Stylisticienne on 13 Dec 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms; for example, WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included. However, blog.com (blog.co.uk, blog.de etc) tags are not included, because they don't appear in the blogs' RSS feeds.

It does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts. The category 'uncategorized' is excluded from search results and it should always be borne in mind that not all bloggers use categories/tags.