Search Results for "translation"

Your search for posts with tags/categories containing translation found 59 posts

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The Kingis Quair

A sneak preview of part of a work in progress, though I promise you that other blog posts will be very soon on their way (including all you might ever want to know about the caesura in Middle English poetry)....
From: Stylisticienne on 13 Sep 2016

Beyond the Anglophone Inner Circle of Chaucer Studies (Candace Barrington)

a guest post by Candace Barrington[ITM has been slowly publishing as blog posts some of the presentations from the New Chaucer Society congress session "Are We Dark Enough Yet? Pale Faces 2016." Cord Whitaker...
From: In the Middle on 11 Sep 2016

‘May this water be a test for you’: trial by cold water in 9th-century Francia

One of the distinctively post-Roman things about post-Roman Europe was the emergence of a new kind of legal procedure, the trial by ordeal. In its various different forms – the main ones were hot...
From: Turbulent Priests on 5 Sep 2016

How to become bishop: ecclesiastical liberty in the ninth century

What’s the best way to become a bishop? Writing around 835, a cleric gave an example of how it should be done. Long ago, there was a rich man from a Lyon senatorial family called Eucherius. He gave...
From: Turbulent Priests on 9 Aug 2016

Vers sur la croix

Recueil de poésies moralisantes, anonyme, en vers Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des manuscrits, Français 2366, fol. 14r. Dieu Soustenez...
From: Manuscript Art on 1 Aug 2016

The Kiss of Justice and Peace

François Ier holds their hands as they kiss: Poésies de « maistre ELOY DU MONT, dict COSTENTIN ». Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département...
From: Manuscript Art on 18 Jul 2016

The Translation of Thomas Becket

Today we celebrate the Feast of the Translation of Thomas Becket. On this day in 1220 the relics of this famous English martyr were ‘translated’ or moved from the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral to an...

Under the Angel’s Gaze: The Divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga

Today sees the publication of a book that we’ve been working on for almost a decade, The Divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga. It’s an annotated translation of a long ninth-century Latin...
From: Turbulent Priests on 28 Jun 2016

Margaret of Anjou and verse-translation

I’m pleased to say that my article on ‘Margaret of Anjou as Patron of English Verse?: The Liber Proverbiorum and the Romans of Partenay’, which will be published in Review of English...
From: Stylisticienne on 22 Jun 2016

Animals, Gesture, and Communication Despite it All

by KARL STEELIt's the week before Kalamazoo, so of course I've just drafted my New Chaucer Society Paper.Yeah. So, as I'm in Berlin, I'll simply wave fondly at Kalamazoo from a distance, and as I have...
From: In the Middle on 4 May 2016

Will the real Roman Emperor please stand up?

For a couple of years, I’ve been working intermittently on a translation of a long letter sent by the Carolingian king and emperor of Italy, Louis II, to his Byzantine counterpart Basil in 871....
From: Turbulent Priests on 2 May 2016

Pope Leo of Bourges

One of the firmest proponents of judicial “benefit of clergy” in the ninth century was the great archbishop Hincmar (when it suited him, anyway). And one of his favourite texts for proving...
From: Turbulent Priests on 28 Apr 2016

Baby Steps

It’s #WhanThatAprilleDay16 today,  a celebration of ‘oold bokes yn sondrye oold tonges’ and languages which are Old, or Middle, or Ancient, or Dead.  To learn any of those languages...
From: Stylisticienne on 1 Apr 2016

Attacking the pilgrim

Contient : 1° « Le Pellerinaige de la vie humaine » [par GUILLAUME DE DEGUILLEVILLE] ; 2° Petit Poëme sur la mort Source: gallica.bnf.fr Bibliothèque nationale de France,...
From: Manuscript Art on 6 Mar 2016

“Certainly God is angry with us” – a sermon on the Vikings

In a previous blog, I gave some (admittedly lighthearted) advice on how to fend off a vampire attack, culled from a twelfth-century chronicle. In a slightly more serious tone, this blog’s about how...
From: Turbulent Priests on 22 Feb 2016

Lucifer et ses faulx complices

« Miroir de la salvation humaine, que frere VINCENT DE BEAUVAIS, Jacobin,… jadis confesseur du roy de France Mgr. saint Loys, fist et compila en latin rimé de doublettes, lequel a esté...
From: Manuscript Art on 15 Feb 2016

Soft wax

I’ve been astounded to find thumbprints on the backside of seals before, but I never thought I’d see a depiction of the process as we see here. The text also provides an interesting analogy...
From: Manuscript Art on 13 Feb 2016

A brief note on Britons and wealhstodas

The following is just a very quick post about the historically interesting Old English word wealhstod, 'translator' or 'interpreter' (plural wealhstodas), which is used of a variety of people including...
From: Caitlin Green on 11 Feb 2016

Fit for a Queen

This post is really just the story of how one thing leads to another in research.  It’s also to tell you about what I’ve been working on in the last three weeks, a sudden and unexpected...
From: Stylisticienne on 25 Jan 2016

Pas d’armes de Saudricourt

Contient : 1° Traité abrégé de « la forme des tournoys… au temps du roy Uterpandragon » ; 2° « Les Noms, armes et blasons des chevaliers et compaignons...
From: Manuscript Art on 23 Jan 2016

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